1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent: No Pole

The 1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent without a pole is a distinctive variety of an already fascinating coin series, notable for its historical significance and unique design features. Minted during the early years of the United States Mint, this coin holds a special place in American numismatics.

Designed by Robert Scot, the obverse of the 1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent features a left-facing bust of Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap, a symbol of freedom and liberty. The word "LIBERTY" is inscribed above the bust, with the date "1796" below.

However, what sets this variety apart is the absence of the pole or staff held by Liberty, which is typically seen in later issues of the Liberty Cap Half Cent series.

On the reverse, a wreath encircles the denomination "HALF CENT" in the center. The absence of the pole on the obverse is a distinctive characteristic that adds to the allure and appeal of this particular variety among collectors.

The 1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent without a pole is believed to be an early die state or a die variation, with subsequent modifications made to the design shortly after production began. As a result, examples of this variety are relatively scarce compared to later varieties of the coin.

For collectors, acquiring a 1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent without a pole represents a unique opportunity to own a piece of American numismatic history. Each coin serves as a tangible link to the early days of the United States Mint and the challenges faced in creating a national coinage system.

In summary, the 1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent without a pole is a prized rarity among numismatists. Its distinctive design and historical significance make it a coveted addition to any collection, cherished for its beauty, rarity, and place in American coinage lore.

The 1796 Liberty Cap Half Cent without a pole stands as a captivating testament to the early years of the United States Mint and the complexities of coin production during that era.

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